Eco Chamber Marks it’s Territory

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Last week saw the arrival of the various components which will make up the Eco Chamber arrive at Rimrose Valley Country Park. Nestled into the appointed hill they have carved out a route over the brow. Each component is made from re-claimed tyre rims with additional textures of biodegradable plastic bags added using a heat seal process. Next week after a much needed few days of rainfall the Eco Chamber will be built into the landscape.

The Eco Chamber is part of the Rimrose Valley Art Trail as part of the Biennial Independents. Seven artists will present works throughout the Park. Alice Lenkiewicz will transcribe poetry directly onto the pathway in the Goodness Trail. Throughout the Biennial, Sarah Nicholson will present Ir/revocable adding to the entrances of the prominent greenspace. Then in September, after an exhausting walking challenge on the continent, Sarah Jane Richards will bring us Willow Nests.

Environmental Art at its finest, activism to Save Our Park!

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Eco Chamber

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Eco Chamber is the latest sculptural commission from North West Based artist Alison Little. As part of the Liverpool Independents 2018 Biennial it will form part of the Rimrose Valley Country Park environment art trail.

 

Concept: Eco Chamber is to be a form created solely from re-claimed materials, a large pod-like structure, fully spherical. The skeleton of the structures is formed from waste car tires rims structure into spherical forms giving the impression of large atom-like shape. The tire rims are wrapped in bio-degradable green garden waste bags adapting traditional crochet techniques to contemporary practise. Plastic bag usage is essential to the ‘Green’ methodology with them being a major contributor to waste culture in the UK and globally. Some element of green incorporated within the mainly white forms, adding to the ‘Green’ credential but not taking complete control of the colour spectrum. The intention is form to forms to stand out, but not to obscure the urban landscape, Sculptural form which will work will the existing environment. Although made entirely from man made materials and 20th and 21st century manufacturing processes the materials and the working process produce a very organic form. Similar in appearance to traditional thatch works, the medium of plastic bag having straw-like qualities and the use of circular forms commonplace . Using foliage adds to the environmental elements of the chamber, use of beans and sweetcorn plants which are in season at the proposed period adding purpose to the aesthetic. The chamber will be around 2 meters high, a strong visual forms which stamp an environmental message on the festival.

Biennial Independents

Rimrose Valley Country Park

 

I am the Superlambanana

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I am the Superlambanana

I sit on the mantle-piece, brought in a drunken surge from the local bottle shop. Originally cast in China, a miniature of Liverpool finest public artworks. I stand on my plinth and I look around this room, I see the early morning starts, breakfasts followed by the waking of the dog and then the cleaning of the front room. Observing my raised peak tail I see it lacks the rub and polish it received at the factory in China, again when unpacked at the wholesalers, then an extra special rub over when placed by the spirits at the Off Licence. At the factory I was one in a million, on the cargo ship one in a thousand then finally a simple sidekick to the bells whiskey which too many drunks chose to ignore when they stagger into the shop. Here I am an individual, I am the Superlambanana not one of many. I should be kept shinier and more glam to twinkle in the sunlight, but I stand proud as an almighty One-off. Watching everything going on I am central to the house, the head of the main room. I am the focal point, I am the master, I am the controller. Watching them argue, listening to them make-up, seeing their tears and hearing their laughter. I understand their desires and their disdain and I watch when they collide. The pet dog gets a free rein of downstairs, but he is nothing on me, I am glossy and smooth, shapely, standing tall and proud. He is rough coated, shreds his fur and bounces in excitement. He scratches and brings home flea’s, I gleam clean, I am the supreme.

I am the Superlambana.

‘I am the Superlambanana’ is a work of Flash Fiction written by Alison Little in February of 2018, she has lived in Liverpool for fifteen years and witnessed the Superlambanana become a symbol of the city.

a Lesson in Pseudosciene

side vision bee copy

A Lesson in Pseudoscience was the second design submitted by Alison Little for Bea in the City, the mass public art trail for Manchester, summer 2018.

A lesson in Pseudoscience looks to present an image of a physics-based lecture where the science behind the flight of the bumblebee is explored. We look at concepts presented by famous entomologist August Magnan who determined that through the laws of fight the Bumble Bee simply couldn’t fly. We introduce concepts of formula to work on the potential wingspan, angles and wing texture. Examples of helicopter propellers and small tornadoes are illustrated in reference to the physics-defying flight part of this great insect. The base contains the final statement from the Bee itself ‘I can fly’ showing he is clearly about to perform the action of flight.

Ariana Grande Bee

side vision Ariana copy

Ariana Grande Bee is the design submitted for Bee in the city, the mass public art trail to take place in the summer of 2018 in Manchester. This design is one of two submitted by Artist Alison Little.

Ariana Grande Bea is a tribute to the star Ariana Grande who took to the people Manchester and the nations hearts after the devastating terror attack in May of last year. The representation plays tribute to the costumes she wears to performs many of her gigs, with the full swag of a singing and dancing sensation. In the base of the form, we make reference to ‘One Love Manchester’ the slogan presented on the famous white hoodie she wore for the charity concert held only two weeks after the carnage of the explosion.

Pendle Sculpture Trail

A Quick look at the Prosal put forward by Alison Little for the Pendle Sculpture Trail.

The Proposal

Bat Hanger presents an installation where an Aitken wood tree is to be taken over by bat-like forms. The main structure of the tree to include around 100 hanging forms, similar in form to the way in which they sleep suspended upside down with there wings tucked around them. As they are to be arranged at high up points simple cable ties can be used for fitting. 10 bats in flight motion to be added in lower down positions using wall mount fittings. The bats to be represented are to be similar to the noctule bat and a tree with potential for roost to be sited. Bats to be produced through laser cut technology using plywood as a natural material, the be finished in exterior wood gloss and would simply need to be re-coated in terms of maintenance. The higher bats the be hung using cable tie above the likelihood of any vandalism. The in-flight bats the be fitted using black wall mounts, making them difficult to abduct. Use of scaffolding for the fitting of the high up hanging bats, cordless power drill equipment for the use of wall mounts.

The installation draws on the Pendle witch trials, the hanger a play on terms to address the 11 who were hanged after being found guilty of witchcraft. The Pendle witch trial held in 1612 saw the prosecution of the 12 witches of Pendle forest for the death of 10 people through the use of witchcraft. Of the 12, 11 were found guilty and hanged, there were 9 women and 2 men. 6 of the Pendle witches came from one of 2 families. It remains one of the most famous witchcraft trials in history.

For each of the 11 hanged we present 10 bats, totalling 110.

Bats have been associated with witchcraft since Biblical times, the Bible giving reference to them as unclean animals and the Old Testament prohibits the eating of bat meat. Painters, sculptors and writer have connected bats and the devil throughout the ages, the wings of the devil frequently bat like in form. These associations strengthened throughout the middle ages and into the period of the Pendle witch trials. Magic practices often require the use of bats, Shakespeare’ Macbeth using the nocturnal creature in an opening scene. In modern depictions of witches, it remains the most common companion for the satanic female.

Secondary concerns about the installation are to increase awareness of bat population decline and the work of the Bat Conservation Trust.

Pendle Sculpture Trail