Block Works

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Block Works is the latest concept based practice from Alison Little: comprising of a series of sculptural forms which represent areas of urban residence. An ethnology process where collections of discarded objects are cemented together in block form. The artefacts are selected and encased in the common urban material offering an explanation of those who occupy the city space, their lifestyles and methods human existence.

Everton Block Works engages our attention with the towering form of the engine suspension system, reflecting the second-hand car culture commonplace within the area. Several narcotics smoking devices emerge from the upper surface, indicating drug use within the external environment. Homelessness or the misguided pursuits accountable as youth culture. Contrasted by the healthy activities of dog walking, shown by a lead and enhanced by an exercise equipment suspension spring. An adjacent feather shows the ever present urban pigeon, commonplace within cities globally. The top surface encases a heavy industrial ring, accompanied by screw findings, rope matter throughout the form. Manual work being common with local inhabitants. Child’s playthings are present, but items from £1 stores from lower-income families. The edges of the block are lined by food consumer packaging waste: crisp packets, fizzy and alcoholic drinks cans. A suburb where the unhealthy diet is prominent and drink alcohol a persistent activity. The greens and greys of the blocks finish reflect the mix of residential and urban green space which dominates the Everton area.

The top section of Anfield Block Works is entangled by the dynamics of a discarded cable. Other electric wastes reflect a culture where the inhabitants are happy to discard debris freely. An array of drinks top illustrates further examples of poor diet, however, an exercise water bottle top suggests healthy activities. This is joined by a dog toy and tennis ball, positive pursuits within a leisure space. Again, a pigeon feather evidence of urban wildlife. Examples of gambling additions within the district can be drawn from the miniature blue pen of the bookies. Wire wool, cable systems and sponge matter indicating manual tasks occurring within the outdoor spectrum. The Liverpool football stadium ‘Anfield’ being a central hub of the district. The inflatables from matchdays, the drinks straws from spectators present in the block formed in the shadows of the Kop. The final colour showing a degraded range of greens and blacks, an urban green space heavily polluted by the traffic of the stadium.

The Block Works Collection with expand across the city and further afield. More collections with be collated, encased and presented as representations of the city and occupants.

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Park Benched

 

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Park Benched is a fictional works by Alison Little.

Explicit content warning.

I stand solid and well positioned overlooking the lake in Stanley Park. A traditional park bench is my primary role. High-quality seating provision for the park dwellers of the North Liverpool district of the famed Anfield. To my front, I have the Kop and the Liverpool Football Club stadium, to my rear I have the home of Everton Football Club: Goodison Park. I am the great divider, a barrier and a leading resting point solution and clearly not a rotting park bench in need of a lick of paint.

Approached by a young man, he sits down looking a little too eager. He has been here several times over the summer months. Not from Liverpool, he wears baggy jeans combined with a smarter cotton shirt, his neck is engulfed by a mass of multicolour plastic jewellery. Hair dyed a bright range of colours from pink to blue, and a hoody is tied around his waist. His look is finished off by a token tribute to his sexuality, a rainbow lapel badge pinned to the pocket of his shirt.

He must be a student off Uni for the summer months I think to myself. Viewing the soft features of his cheekbones I ponder over the look of anticipation on his face. Here come another man, much older, he has been visiting my bench for countless years, a regular of many moons. Dressed in a variety of faded shades of black he brandishes a wiry greying beard, although summer he wears a dark jacket, dusty and unkempt in appearance. His eye twitches as it always does from under the well-worn wool hat which tops of his thinning figure.

They begin to talk quietly to one another, after around five minutes they leave my seating solution and skulk off towards the bushes towards the left-hand gate, a quieter space within the park.

After around a quarter of an hour, they return and take a seat together. As of earlier, they talk quietly for a while. I look at the student, the innocence and naivety glowing from his flushed face. Here it comes, I’ve seen this many times before, the finishing gesture. The older man squeezes his knee, clenching his hands gently a few times, then subtly he slots a rolled ten-pound note into the shirt pocket beside the rainbow lapel badge. Rubbing his shoulder goodbye he makes his way off, his dark trousers trailing the ground slightly as he sludges away.

The vulnerability of the student, the lack of understanding apparent on his face. Not fully comprehending what had just happened, unsure of why he had been given money. As he decides to leave I hope never to see him again, taking a seat, recognising there are better ways of living.

Alison Little

 

A-Z of Remarkable Men

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A-Z of Remarkable Men is the latest print from Alison Little, she talks us through the men that made the Grade to feature on the delightful artwork.

Adam, the original Man. Created by God and the start of Mankind, we owe an awful lot to him.

Banksy the graffiti artist who has taken street art to new levels.

Charles Dickens, the legendary author of the Victoria era who gave us the likes of Scrooge, Oliver and Nancy.

My Dad, the men who bring us into the World, fed us, clothes us and never stop caring how we getting along.

Albert Einstein, the German born physicist who developed the theory of relativity.

Frank Bruno, Boxer and all round champion who brought the Nation together throughout the Eighties and Nineties.

George Best, Northern Ireland and Manchester United professional footballer.

Damien Hirst, original YBA (Young British Artist) and Turner Prize winner who projected London to the Capital of the Art world.

Isaac Newton, one of the most influential scientists of all time who developed the theory of gravity.

John Lennon, Founding member of the Beatles and the legend that followed.

Keats, leading figure in the second wave of Romantic poets.

Leonardo da Vinci, Renaissance Artist have gave us many great works including the Mona Lisa.

Matt Damon, Hollywood actor who shot into the limelight after the success of Good Will Hunting.

Nelson, Naval Commander who insured Britain ruled the waves during the Napoleonic wars, finally being killer by a sniper at the Battle of Trafalgar.

Oasis, the Gallagher lead band that was the Nineties, reminding us ‘Don’t look back in anger.’

Paul McCartney, founding member of the Beatles and the legend which still is Sir Paul.

Quentin Blake, Illustrator who brought Roald Dahl’s books to life with his colourful characters.

Wayne Rooney, Everton, Manchester United and England International professional footballer.

Scott of the Antarctic, Royal Navy Officer who lead the fateful expedition to the South Pole.

Tom Daley, double World Champion diver.

Usher, American Singer, Songwriter and Dancer.

Vincent van Gogh, the Dutch Post-Impressionist painter who brought the South of France to life with renditions such as Starry Night.

Winston Churchill, the Wartime leader who lead us to victory in the Second World War.

OXlade Chamberlain, Arsenal, Liverpool and England International Professional footballer.

Yves Klein, French artist considered to be one of the most important figures in Post War European Art, most notable for his monotone works.

The mask of Zorro, Johnston McCulley’ character who escapes from prison to find his long lost daughter and avenge to death of his wife.

The prints are A4 in size, available framed or unframed from Arts Hub in Lark Lane, Liverpool.

Arts Hub

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We are Clubmore

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‘We are Clubmore’ is a mural proposal put forward by Alison Little for a regeneration scheme running in the Clubmoor region of Liverpool.

‘We are Clubmore’ combines typography and abstract painting skill to produce this striking mural. We see a mix of techniques which will draw attention to the regeneration which is happening in Clubmoor. The slogan generated ‘We are Clubmore’ represents to people who reside and work in Clubmore and represent how the community which they create. The use of blue tones and the red backing refer subtly to the Liverpool and Everton Football Clubs which are both n walking distance from where the mural is to be sited. The re-arrangement of the ‘MORE’ is to indicate a cross road, a turning point for the Club more towards a more positive environment.

My Clubmoor

 

 

Seeing Red

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Seeing Red is the name of the game for Arts Hub’s latest exhibition: The Fabric of Fine Art. Alison Little brings us her textiles works, red being the focus of her latest creations.

Red Flowers is a painstakingly detailed miniature framed embroidery. The scarlet floral forms are located beside the Liverpool Football Club Stadium from the Delilah walk entrance through Stanley Park. The prowess of the Premiership football clubs sporting success reflected in the vivid primary colour of the Botanics, contrasted by the freshness of the greens. A striking piece to brighten and add focus to any wall.

The Red Lady was simply still letting off the aroma of fresh paint when positioned in the first-floor gallery space. The three heads; green, blue and red, invaded the display cabinet bring some thought and contemplation to the array of artists mediums. Heads which will turn heads, textures which engage with our tactile qualities, colours which carry our imaginations to new places.

Finally, fresh from her singer sewing machine the wall based machine embroidery ‘In the Red Dress I wear to your funeral’ stole the focus of the show. A strong piece inspired by the poem written by one of America’s leading poets; Erin Belieu. The poem is a fast paces work highlighting the resentment felt towards a lover of an outer marriage affair. We are taken through a rampage of hate at the funeral, encountering images of his wife and family. In the textiles works, we see a devil woman crouched within a coffin, surrounded by coloured fabrics representing the flowers which are present at funerals. A mass of colour, fabrics and creativity brought together into one determined artistic upshot.

If you are anywhere in Liverpool this week make sure it’s Arts Hub on Lark Lane.

2-8th October

Arts Hub 47, Lark Lane, L17 8UW

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Arts Hub