Minted

Minted, an exploration of Capitalism is the latest artworks from Liverpool based artist: Alison Little.

‘Minted’ stretches across the painting, reflecting wealth through the Scouse colloquialism. However, it is neither promotional of defamatory, objective towards the acquisition of wealth.

The concept of the painting was conceived BC (Before Covid), it was worked on during the pandemic and completed during late August which was being proclaimed as AC (After Covid). Now being exhibited in what can only be considered MC (Mid Covid) due to the escalating rise of cases defining a second peak of the virus. In context, the works can be considered more potent during the contemporary climate of mass unemployment and unprecedented economic decline, in the UK and Globally.

The painting presents maximism of the most extreme, highly patterned, a tactile variation of texture and a mass of colour. The background manipulates acrylic pouring techniques, suggesting that the text has been ‘Slam dunked’ into position. The range of purples, a regal infusion, combined with the Gothic font to imply Royalty. Currently, the Queen’ estates (UK) have lost over 35 million as a result of reduced tourism from coronavirus. The golds of ‘Minted’ have scrapped with black acrylic, perhaps implying ‘Dirty money’. The letters are almost camouflaged within the visual plane, akin to wild animal fur, suggesting revenue and opulence.

Ground-breaking, contemporary work brought to us from a leading North-West based artist.


Acrylic on mixed media panel
80×80 cm
£250

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Brit Pop Guitar

2 fingers

The Brit Pop Guitar is a sensation: Visual arts meets music culture with the dynamism of the Nineties which we all love to remember.

The iconic Union Jack which was imprinted on many of the bands of the era immerses within the surface of the guitar. A gritty rendition, presenting many blemishes, reflecting the disenchantment of the decade.

An unusual vision of beauty, the sexy NHS spec wearing girl, projects from the base with the same impact she made in the Pulp’ Common People music video.

Towards the lower section, we have a crowd at the festival which pre-dates Christianity: Glastonbury. Taking us back to a simpler time when entrance meant scaling the fence, away from the inflated cost of festival tickets commonplace within contemporary culture.

On the other side of the bridge, two fingers affront our focus. The insult which many, Jarvis Cocker of Pulp, in particular, brandished throughout appearances. A decade which encountered economic decline, instigating uprisings of dissident activism. The generation which fought back against the raw deal they were inheriting.

Centrally we engage with the Oasis symbol, the motif printed over two levels, dominating the sound-hole. Rendering Britishness, red white and blue, backing the stretches of the guitar strings.

Negativity and dissatisfaction, prevalent of the era, is projected from the upper section:

‘Modern life is Rubbish’

A term coined by the staple of Brit Pop: Blur. The graffiti-style conveys the widespread anti-establishment dissatisfaction of the Nineties.

Butterflies flutter over the neck of the instrument. Our late Millennium radio stations were taken over by Richard Ashcroft of the Verve belting out:

‘Don’t go chasing butterflies.’

A sobering, reflective lyric in a time when heroin was being widely consumed across our nation. A drug which had not only engulfed our cities but had filtered out to our towns and villages.

The head-stock displays one of Noel Gallagher’s acclaimed anoraks. Oasis refashioned the anorak, making it desirable once again. Iconic of Britain, not only due to the protection it offers from our frequent rain showers, but equally re-visualizing the white on the red of the St Georges Cross.

The three-quarter sized Brit Pop guitar is set to make as much impact as its full-size contemporaries. A spectacular string instrument which reminds us why we still celebrate Nineties Brit Pop.

£350

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